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How To Beat A Wicked Festival Hangover

How To Beat A Wicked Festival Hangover

A music festival can be a double edged sword. On one side there is copious time and opportunity to rage, but a severe hangover can leave your carefully planned week in tatters as you spend crucial time sleeping in a darkened room by yourself. 

13 Things You Didn’t Know About Topo Chico

13 Things You Didn’t Know About Topo Chico

You already know there are times when there's nothing quite as refreshing as popping one of those clear, bubbly bottles. But there's also a lot you may not know. Specifically, these 13 things.

1. It's amazing in Mexican cocktails

Josephine House and La Condesa both pour mean Topo Palomas. Chupacabra's got El Conquistador with Cruz Silver tequila and fresh lime. And newcomer Whisler's does the Mexicano: Dos Armadillos reposado, Cocchi Torino sweet vermouth, Aperol, Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao, mole bitters, and an orange peel. But The Ranch Water at Ranch 616 might be the ultimate in Topo cocktail-dom: a super-strong margarita with Hornitos Reposado, Citronge, and lime juice that you temper with a full bottle of the Mole.

Read about the 12 other things here…

New Logo and Packaging for Topo Chico by Interbrand

New Logo and Packaging for Topo Chico by Interbrand

(Via UnderConsideration.com) First sold in 1895, Topo Chico is a brand of sparkling mineral water sourced and bottled in Monterrey, Mexico. Sold only regionally in Northern Mexico through the 1980s, Topo Chico was introduced to all of Mexico in the early 1980s and exported to the U.S. in 1987. For some reason, Topo Chico is huge in Austin, TX — I had never heard of it before coming here. Now, the fizzy beverage is readying itself for even bigger expansion and has introduced a new logo and packaging designed by the Mexico City office of Interbrand.

I will be first to admit that snow on typography is one of the most endearing things in the world. You can put snow on Helvetica and I’ll like it. The old logo had a very authentic vernacular charm. You could picture it painted on the wall outside a cantina. Despite this pleasing patina, it’s not the most efficient of logos and not the best executions of snow on type, looking more like cupcake frosting. The new logo does a great job in evolving its essence by keeping the structure of the wordmark and refining all its characters and paying homage to the snow with a white highlight across the top. The new letterforms are pleasing maintaing the playfulness of the original while adding some visual maturity. The only issue is the “p”, that stands out like a sore thumb without any curlycue or proper connection to the letter before or after. Other than that, all the maneuvers on the harsh terminals combined with the toothpaste-y terminals on the other end (as in the “C”) are really nice.

Read the full article here...

Topo Chico, I Love You The Very Most

Topo Chico, I Love You The Very Most

(Via The Dallas Observer) Sometimes, I drink things that contain no alcohol at all. These occurrences are relatively rare, but it is important that I not be entirely tanked for my regular 10 a.m. conference call. One cannot survive on gin alone, which means that zero-proof libations are an absolutely essential part of our lives.

Doctors suggest that we replace all of that sugar and chemicals from our old soda habits with water, but water is boring. There are only so many glasses of plain-ass water that you can chug before you're ready to strangle Gwyneth Paltrow and everyone else who ever told you that healthy living was worth it. You've tried the stupid fruit infusions and the weird flavoring additives that are mostly propylene glycol, but hopefully you've just grown up and moved on to fizzy water.

Read the rest of this article at the Dallas Observer website...

Topo Chico is Espresso’s Best Friend in Texas

Topo Chico is Espresso’s Best Friend in Texas

Photos by Desiree Espada

Photos by Desiree Espada

BY ZAC CADWALADER

As interest in specialty coffee continues its meteoric rise, so too has the number of shops opening in big cities and small towns around the world. Here in the United States, coffee bars have been experimenting for years with different ways to enhance their espresso service for their customers, or at the very least distinguish it from that of their newfound competition. From reclaimed wood trays that visually titillate to snifter glasses and champagne flutes that enhance the olfactory experience, more and more shops are implementing an approach that goes beyond the traditional demitasse-and-saucer-only preparation.

We know of coffee bars choosing to augment the café experience by pairing espresso with a rogues gallery of other imbibeables: hazelnut milk, carbonated black tea, all manner of macaroons and macarons, and even cappuccino and milk have been served alongside espresso in shops across the United States. What you pair with your espresso says as much about your coffee bar these days as the espresso itself.

What Is Mineral Water?

What Is Mineral Water?

Although water covers three quarters of the world and adorns the skies in its gaseous form, the truth is water fit for human consumption is growing scarce. We all must take care to conserve and care for it as we do our greatest treasure: life.
Nevertheless, nature gives us a very special kind of water from the depths of the earth, one that has been enriched with the earth’s minerals and naturally purified through filtering during its journey underground.

Mineral water is water from a mineral source that contains various minerals, such as salts and sulfur compounds. Mineral water may be effervescent (i.e., “sparkling”) due to contained gases.

Traditionally, mineral waters were used or consumed at their sources. This was often referred to as “taking the waters” or “taking the cure.” Civilization eventually developed around these sources, and people used them for spas, baths, or wells. The term “spa” was a place where the water was used for soaking; “bath,” where the water was used primarily for bathing, therapeutics, or recreation; and “well,” where the water was to be consumed.

Today it is far more common for mineral water to be bottled at the source for distributed consumption. Traveling to the mineral water site for direct access to the water is rare, and in many cases not possible because of exclusive commercial ownership rights. There are more than 3,000 brands of mineral water commercially available worldwide.

Mineral vs. Mineralized?

Mineral water and mineralized water are similar but not identical.

“Mineralized” water is water that may come from a drinking water source and to which minerals are added, therefore obtaining its mineral properties artificially. “Mineral water” gets its distinction through natural processes and not by human intervention.

Origins

Mineral water comes from natural sources like wells, pure and rich in minerals. Unlike tap water that receives different treatments before human consumption, mineral water is bottled directly from the source, without adding any chemical elements. It only goes through a physical process of filtration to ensure maximum purity.

  • Mineral waters can be classified according to their origin:
  • Meteorological: Produced by rain, snow, and de-icing.
  • Juvenile: Those that see daylight when surfacing.
  • Fossil: Formed from sediments deposited on the sea floor.
  • Mixed: Composed from a mixture of meteorological, juvenile, and fossil water.

Uses

Topo Chico Mineral Water is healthy and tastes great. One can enjoy its refreshing taste anytime at any occasion.
Thanks to its natural mineral composition, Topo Chico quenches thirst, assists in the digestive process, or can be used as a mixer in alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks.

Also, it has no calories and adds a delicious accent to drinks when used as a mixer. Enjoy Topo Chico with salt, lemon and salt, fruit juice, whiskey, brandy, tequila, gin, vodka, and, of course, by itself!

Topo Chico Delivers Fabulous Fizz

Topo Chico Delivers Fabulous Fizz

(Via the Dallas Morning News) Move over, Perrier and San Pellegrino. Dallas is bubbling with enthusiasm for Topo Chico, a Mexican sparkling mineral water. It has legions of fans, including some of the city’s most discriminating palates.

Topo Chico is a staple at some Dallas bars, replacing soda water in cocktails and virgin spritzers, or accompanying stiff drinks, even espresso. You can buy it everywhere; it’s available at discount markets, Hispanic supermarkets and liquor stores.

Read the rest of this article here…

Topo Chico @ SXSW

Topo Chico @ SXSW

We’ve officially kicked off the concert, sports, and festival season for 2014 after sponsoring several events during SXSW with Gibson Guitar Texas, Heartbreaker Banquet, Small Room Collective, Up Collective, Converse, and Thrasher Magazine – get ready kids – we’ve got several events at Circuit of The Americas, Lollapalooza, Austin City Limits Music Festival (ACL), and several other events where we’ll dishing out the bubbles!

Dallas Pin Show Hi-lights

Dallas Pin Show Hi-lights

The Pin Show provides emerging fashion industry designers, photographers, artists, stylists and retail buyers a profound launching platform for independent work in the fashion industry. They also provide the public a unique fashion experience that is generally reserved for high end designers and their clientele.

 

Topo Chico is proud to be an official sponsor of the 2014 Dallas Pin Show.

The Legend

The Legend

This is the legend speaks of the virtues of the water that has given its name, since 1895, to one of the most important drinks in all of Mexico: Topo Chico Mineral Water.

There was a beautiful Aztec princess who suffered a terrible disease, so strange that none of her father’s doctors, Moctezuma I Ilhuicamina, successor in 1440 of the king Itzcoatl had been able to cure.

Desperate, the King turned to the older priests in the kingdom to find a cure for his beautiful daughter. They told him that according to the timeless stories of travelers, in a far away northern land, there was a strange and hidden source whose waters flowed at high temperatures, waters in which one only needed to bathe in or drink from to regain vigor, joy, strength and health.

Encouraged by this news, Moctezuma I ordered an immediate expedition to take his daughter to this amazing source. After traveling long and rugged roads, the expedition and the Princess reached a fertile valley flanked by mountains. To the east they saw a mountain with the form of woman’s face (now “Cerro de la Silla”) and also found a mole-shaped hill, from whose slopes flowed the prodigal source.

After spending some time there, taking baths and drinking water from the source, the daughter of Moctezuma I, his priests and chiefs returned to the Anahuac lands optimistic, strong, happy and healthy. The news about the recovery of the Princess spread throughout the kingdom and has passed from generation to generation up until modern times.